Selected bibtex entries for papers in the
Art-based modeling and rendering project.


@article{Cohen:1999:AIF,
   author    = {Jonathan M. Cohen and Lee Markosian and
          Robert C. Zeleznik and John F. Hughes and Ronen Barzel},
   title     = {An Interface for Sketching 3{D} Curves},
   journal   = {1999 ACM Symposium on Interactive 3{D} Graphics},
   pages     = {17--22},
   year      = {April 1999},
   note      = {ISBN 1-58113-082-1},
   editor    = {Jessica Hodgins and James D. Foley},
   publisher = {ACM SIGGRAPH}
}

@inproceedings{Cohen:2000:HAW,
   author    = {Jonathan M. Cohen and John F. Hughes and Robert C. Zeleznik},
   title     = {Harold: A World Made of Drawings},
   booktitle = {Proceedings of the First International Symposium on
                  Non Photorealistic Animation and Rendering (NPAR)
                  for Art and Entertainment},
   year      = {2000},
   month     = {June},
   note      = {To be held in Annecy, France.}
}

@article{Kowalski:1999:ARO,
   author    = {Michael A. Kowalski and Lee Markosian and
                J. D. Northrup and Lubomir Bourdev and
                Ronen Barzel and Loring S. Holden and John Hughes},
   title     = {Art-Based Rendering of Fur, Grass, and Trees},
   journal   = {Proceedings of SIGGRAPH 99},
   pages     = {433--438},
   year      = {August 1999},
   note      = {ISBN 0-20148-560-5. Held in Los Angeles, California.},
   annote    = {Artists and illustrators can evoke the complexity of
                fur or vegetation with relatively few well-placed
                strokes. We present an algorithm that uses strokes to
                render 3D computer graphics scenes in a stylized manner
                suggesting the complexity of the scene without
                representing it explicitly. The basic algorithm is
                customizable to produce a range of effects including
                fur, grass and trees, as we demonstrate in this paper
                and accompanying video. The algorithm is implemented
                within a broader framework that supports procedural
                stroke-based textures on polyhedral models. It renders
                mod-erately complex scenes at multiple frames per
                second on current graphics workstations, and provides
                some interframe coherence.},
   series    = {Computer Graphics Proceedings, Annual Conference Series},
   editor    = {Alyn Rockwood},
   publisher = {Addison Wesley Longman},
   keywords  = {Non-photorealistic rendering, graftals, procedural textures}
}

@article{Markosian:1997:RNR,
   author    = {Lee Markosian and Michael A. Kowalski
                and Samuel J. Trychin and Lubomir D. Bourdev
                and Daniel Goldstein and John F. Hughes},
   title     = {Real-Time Nonphotorealistic Rendering},
   journal   = {Proceedings of SIGGRAPH 97},
   pages     = {415--420},
   year      = {August 1997},
   note      = {ISBN 0-89791-896-7. Held in Los Angeles, California.},
   annote    = {Nonphotorealistic rendering (NPR) can help make
                comprehensible but simple pictures of complicated
                objects by employing an economy of line. But current
                nonphotorealistic rendering is primarily a batch
                process. This paper presents a real-time
                nonphotorealistic renderer that deliberately trades
                accuracy and detail for speed. Our renderer uses a
                method for determining visible lines and surfaces which
                is a modification of Appel's hidden-line algorithm,
                with improvements which are based on the topology of
                singular maps of a surface into the plane. The method
                we describe for determining visibility has the
                potential to be used in any NPR system that requires a
                description of visible lines or surfaces in the
                scene. The major contribution of this paper is thus to
                describe a tool which can significantly improve the
                performance of these systems. We demonstrate the system
                with several nonphotorealistic rendering styles, all of
                which operate on complex models at interactive frame
                rates.},
   series    = {Computer Graphics Proceedings, Annual Conference Series},
   editor    = {Turner Whitted},
   publisher = {Addison Wesley},
   keywords  = {non-photorealistic rendering}
}

@article{Markosian:1999:SAC,
   author    = {Lee Markosian and Jonathan M. Cohen and
                Thomas Crulli and John F. Hughes},
   title     = {Skin: A Constructive Approach to Modeling Free-form Shapes},
   journal   = {Proceedings of SIGGRAPH 99},
   pages     = {393--400},
   year      = {August 1999},
   note      = {ISBN 0-20148-560-5. Held in Los Angeles, California.},
   annote    = {We present a new particle-based surface representation
                with which a user can interactively sculpt free-form
                surfaces. The particles maintain mesh connectivity and
                operate under rules that lead them to form
                triangulations with properties that make them suitable
                for use in subdivision. A user interactively guides the
                particles, which we call skin, to grow over a given
                collection of polyhedral elements (or skeletons),
                yielding a smooth surface (through subdivision) that
                approximates the underlying skeletal shapes. Skin
                resembles blobby modeling in the constructive approach
                to modeling it supports, but allows a richer vocabulary
                of skeleton shapes, supports sharp creases where
                desired, and provides a convenient mechanism for adding
                multiresolution surface detail.},
   series    = {Computer Graphics Proceedings, Annual Conference Series},
   editor    = {Alyn Rockwood},
   publisher = {Addison Wesley Longman},
   keywords  = {Free-form modeling, meshes, subdivision, multiresolution}
}

@inproceedings{Markosian:2000:ARW,
   author    = {Lee Markosian and Barbara J. Meier and Michael
                  A. Kowalski and Loring S. Holden and J. D. Northrup
                  and  John F. Hughes},
   title     = {Art-based Rendering with Continuous Levels of Detail},
   booktitle = {Proceedings of the First International Symposium on
                  Non Photorealistic Animation and Rendering (NPAR)
                  for Art and Entertainment},
   year      = {2000},
   month     = {June},
   note      = {To be held in Annecy, France.}
}

@phdthesis{markosian-thesis,
   author    = {Lee Markosian},
   title     = {Art-based Modeling and Rendering for Computer Graphics},
   year      = {2000},
   month     = {May},
   school    = {Brown University}
}
                  
@inproceedings{Northrup:2000:ASA,
   author    = {J. D. Northrup and Lee Markosian},
   title     = {Artistic Silhouettes: A Hybrid Approach},
   booktitle = {Proceedings of the First International Symposium on
                  Non Photorealistic Animation and Rendering (NPAR)
                  for Art and Entertainment},
   year      = {2000},
   month     = {June},
   note      = {To be held in Annecy, France.}
}